Instant ghost imaging: algorithm and on-chip implementation

Nice ghost imaging implementation on a chip. Even though the optical part has been quite well-known for a while, I really like the fact that more groups are starting to incorporate FPGA cards in their optical systems (if only they were easier to use!). Seems like a very interesting way of speeding-up the post-processing of the signal in order to obtain the final image. How long until we see compressive sensing and/or machine learning on a chip?

Experimental setup and operation principle. Extracted from Fig.1 of the paper.

Instant ghost imaging: algorithm and on-chip implementation

Ghost imaging (GI) is an imaging technique that uses the correlation between two light beams to reconstruct the image of an object. Conventional GI algorithms require large memory space to store the measured data and perform complicated offline calculations, limiting practical applications of GI. Here we develop an instant ghost imaging (IGI) technique with a differential algorithm and an implemented high-speed on-chip IGI hardware system. This algorithm uses the signal between consecutive temporal measurements to reduce the memory requirements without degradation of image quality compared with conventional GI algorithms. The on-chip IGI system can immediately reconstruct the image once the measurement finishes; there is no need to rely on post-processing or offline reconstruction. This system can be developed into a realtime imaging system. These features make IGI a faster, cheaper, and more compact alternative to a conventional GI system and make it viable for practical applications of GI.

By Zhe Yang, Wei-Xing Zhang, Yi-Pu Liu, Dong Ruan, and Jun-Lin Li, at Optics Express

https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.379293

Single frame wide-field Nanoscopy based on Ghost Imaging via Sparsity Constraints (GISC Nanoscopy)

This just got posted on the arXiv, and has some interesting ideas inside. Using a ground glass diffuser before a pixelated detector, and after a calibrating procedure where you measure the associated speckle patterns when scanning the sample plane, a single shot of the fluorescence signal speckle pattern can be used to retrieve high spatial resolution images of a sample. Also, the authors claim that the approach should work on STORM setups, achieving really fast and sharp fluorescence images. Nice single-shot example of Compressive Sensing and Ghost Imaging!

Single frame wide-field Nanoscopy based on Ghost Imaging via Sparsity Constraints (GISC Nanoscopy)

by Wenwen Li, Zhishen Tong, Kang Xiao, Zhentao Liu, Qi Gao, Jing Sun, Shupeng Liu, Shensheng Han, and Zhongyang Wang, at arXiv.org

Abstract:

The applications of present nanoscopy techniques for live cell imaging are limited by the long sampling time and low emitter density. Here we developed a new single frame wide-field nanoscopy based on ghost imaging via sparsity constraints (GISC Nanoscopy), in which a spatial random phase modulator is applied in a wide-field microscopy to achieve random measurement for fluorescence signals. This new method can effectively utilize the sparsity of fluorescence emitters to dramatically enhance the imaging resolution to 80 nm by compressive sensing (CS) reconstruction for one raw image. The ultra-high emitter density of 143 {\mu}m-2 has been achieved while the precision of single-molecule localization below 25 nm has been maintained. Thereby working with high-density of photo-switchable fluorophores GISC nanoscopy can reduce orders of magnitude sampling frames compared with previous single-molecule localization based super-resolution imaging methods.

Experimental setup and fundamentals of the calibration and recovery process. Extracted from Fig.1 of the manuscript.

The week in papers (22/04/18)

As a way to keep posts going, I am starting a short recap about interesting papers being published (or being discovered) every now and then. Probably I will write longer posts about some of them in the future.

Let’s get this thing going:

Two papers using ‘centroid estimation‘ to retrieve interesting information:

Extract voice information using high-speed camera

Mariko AkutsuYasuhiro Oikawa, and Yoshio Yamasaki, at The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America