Instant ghost imaging: algorithm and on-chip implementation

Nice ghost imaging implementation on a chip. Even though the optical part has been quite well-known for a while, I really like the fact that more groups are starting to incorporate FPGA cards in their optical systems (if only they were easier to use!). Seems like a very interesting way of speeding-up the post-processing of the signal in order to obtain the final image. How long until we see compressive sensing and/or machine learning on a chip?

Experimental setup and operation principle. Extracted from Fig.1 of the paper.

Instant ghost imaging: algorithm and on-chip implementation

Ghost imaging (GI) is an imaging technique that uses the correlation between two light beams to reconstruct the image of an object. Conventional GI algorithms require large memory space to store the measured data and perform complicated offline calculations, limiting practical applications of GI. Here we develop an instant ghost imaging (IGI) technique with a differential algorithm and an implemented high-speed on-chip IGI hardware system. This algorithm uses the signal between consecutive temporal measurements to reduce the memory requirements without degradation of image quality compared with conventional GI algorithms. The on-chip IGI system can immediately reconstruct the image once the measurement finishes; there is no need to rely on post-processing or offline reconstruction. This system can be developed into a realtime imaging system. These features make IGI a faster, cheaper, and more compact alternative to a conventional GI system and make it viable for practical applications of GI.

By Zhe Yang, Wei-Xing Zhang, Yi-Pu Liu, Dong Ruan, and Jun-Lin Li, at Optics Express

https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.379293

Focusing light through dynamical samples using fast continuous wavefront optimization

The guys at LKB keep going inside turbid media. This time, they have done it really fast. By using a phase spatial light modulator and with the help of a FPGA card, they were able to focus light through a scattering medium at a rate of ~4 kHz.

This is trying to solve a common problem in biological systems when you use the Transmission Matrix approach: live systems evolve, and thus the matrix that you measure is not valid after a really short time.

For me, this is a really nice technical implementation (and not an easy one to do) merging electronics, computer science, and optics to tackle a well defined biological problem.

Focusing light through dynamical samples using fast continuous wavefront optimization,

B. Blochet et al, at Optics Letters

(featured image extracted from Fig. 1 of the manuscript)

Abstract:

We describe a fast continuous optimization wavefront shaping system able to focus light through dynamic scattering media. A micro-electro-mechanical system-based spatial light modulator, a fast photodetector, and field programmable gate array electronics are combined to implement a continuous optimization of a wavefront with a single-mode optimization rate of 4.1 kHz. The system performances are demonstrated by focusing light through colloidal solutions of TiO2 particles in glycerol with tunable temporal stability.